Archive for the ‘Veterinary Medicine’ Category

Preventive Health: Electromagnetic Radiation Awareness for All Beings and Especially Our Kindred Bee’s

After a brief hiatus from blogging, I have returned questioning what the best purpose of my sharings with readers might be.  There are numerous places on the web where one can view heartwarming photo’s of animals that stimulate joy in ourselves.  There are wonderful websites bringing awareness to the alleviation of suffering in animals.  There are more and more photographic demonstrations of the bond between many species.  I feel like sharing news about animal health care that might not be readily available everywhere as well as insights into how new perspectives on the human animal bond can be of benefit to all beings.

With this focus in mind, there appears to be more and more research documenting the potentially detrimental effects of electromagnetic radiation (emr) on bee’s and actually on all beings.  This article on the detrimental effects of smart meters and their collectors in California.  It seems that in this day and age of prioritizing the hypothetical benefits of technology for corporate financial gain over the potential adverse health effects for all beings,  the damage to the health living beings is simply considered collateral damage.  The “precautionary principle” is not even considered.  There are very simple ways to avoid these hazardous health effects, yet corporations do not seem to care at all.  There is continued documentation of the hazardous effects of extended cell phone use as well, yet it too is ignored.  As electromagnetic radiation continues to permeate our environments, we do not look at the cumulative effects on our bodies.  More and more people are becoming electromagnetically sensitive.  Skeptics may cynically state that it is “all in their heads” and actually some of the hazardous emr effects are indeed impacting on the brain.  Animals do not lie though.  If one see’s the detrimental effects on bee’s and other animals, any argument regarding nocebo effect (negative placebo effect) goes out the door.

This article in Global Research offers an excellent brief review of studies.  This video lecture by prominent researchers offers an extended video explaining these effects further.

This article by Dr. Mercola also shares some interesting information regarding emr effects on health.

The growing amount of information should ideally prompt health authorities to acknowledge that these concerns are valid and override any corporate financial interests.   I have seen anecdotal cases of where emr has had significant adverse effects on dogs including increased incidence of seizures in a dog living under high power tension wires.  At the very least, perhaps this post can help make more animal lovers aware of the potential adverse health effects on their animal companions and themselves and then help spread that word and make a positive difference in this world.

As we choose to create a healthier, happier, more compassionate world, the regulation of emr radiation needs to be recognized as an important component to a healthy environment.

 

 

Natural Cancer Therapies

Exposure to Toxins

Cancer has quickly become one of the top causes of death in our companion animals.  It is well accepted now that the primary cause of many diseases is inflammation, from heart disease, to allergies, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease to cancer.  Over the decades of pioneering holistic integrative veterinary care, I have witnessed a tremendous increase in the incidence of cancer.  I believe it is naive to believe that it is just because we have better diagnostics.  Certainly there is a genetic predisposition for certain types of cancer in certain dog breeds, yet, a large percentage is secondary to all the toxic environmental exposures stimulating a chronic inflammation as well as the build up of toxins in the body.   There is a great deal of debate as to what role overvaccination, poor quality pet foods, chronic exposure to pesticides, herbicides etc. have on the body often then manifesting as cancer.  Personally, I am of the belief there is a tipping point of a toxic overload that then can result in the development of cancer.  This article on the use of baking soda, sodium bicarbonate, as a possible treatment for cancer stimulated the writing of this post.

Throughout my career I have been studying, searching and evaluating various natural, nontoxic therapies for cancer.  I have found that a combination of appropriate dietary management, nutraceuticals, chinese herbal formula’s, medicinal mushrooms and vitamins can cause a significant improvement in cancer, sometimes leading to complete remission or at least improving the quality and length of an animal’s life.  Recently I came across this interesting article on the use of baking soda in the treatment of Cancer.  The study is actually being conducted at the University of Arizona Medical School.  I have been aware of this treatment approach, but have not used it extensively in animals.  After reviewing the article, I find that there is indeed some merit in exploring the use of sodium bicarbonate, baking soda in the treatment of cancer in animals.  I will be exploring this approach more and discuss possible studies in animals.  I will keep you posted.

As with many conditions, the ideal is prevention rather than treatment.  The more we can optimize an animals nutrition and minimize exposure to toxins, the better the odds that one will not develop cancer.  Unfortunately with the increased exposure to more and more toxins, pesticides, poor quality food, and the so called “elephant in the living room”, the exposure to the increased radiation from the Fukushima diseaster, we will have to deal with cancer in animals as well as humans more frequently.  I will continue my commitment to explore natural, nontoxic approaches to help all of us live longer, happier, healthier lives.

Kindred Cats, Natural Care and Cancer

Healing Cats

Unique Help for Cats

I always like to share helpful blogs that focus specifically on different areas of my broader blog focus.  Recently I came across the natural cat care blog and was impressed with its content.  I found one particular post on an innovative approach to cancer in cats that fascinated me.  It describes a hands on healing technique developed by a Professor Bengston.  I am also searching for innovative, natural, nontoxic approaches to cancer, but  I must admit I am also a bit of a skeptic when it comes to hands on healing techniques that claim to heal cancer.  I would love to see them work, as the saying goes “the proof is in the pudding”.  I would like to see reproducible, documented results.  That said, the study conducted by Dr. Bengston is quite interesting.  His research titled “The Effect of the “Laying on of Hands” on Transplanted Breast Cancer in Mice”,  was published in the Journal of Scientific Exploration.

When a client asks me about my approach to cancer in cats, I offer them different options depending upon the type of cancer, the age and condition of the cat, the cat’s appetite and ease of administering supplements (liquids, capsules, powders, tablets), the client’s preferences regarding conventional approaches of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy vs. more natural approaches including diet, supplements, herbs, acupuncture and other complementary approaches or an integrative approach combining the best of conventional and complementary therapies.  I also share the importance of a human caretaker’s attitude and thoughts when around their cat and the impact that that may have on their immune system.  I  also suggest that they get the opinion of an integrative oncologist or at least one that is open to a more integrative approach and ask them about the specific success rate of the conventional approaches for that particular type of cancer in cats as well as the potential side effects.  I suggest that they inquire specifically what success means, living one month or one year.  The question based on all of these options is what is there quality of life like.  Cat’s really do live more in the moment and don’t think into the future “oy….I wanted to live till my next birthday or to some unknown future date.  Quality of life to me is more important that the length of time.

In addition to all these approaches, I would love nothing more than to see Dr. Bengston’s approach work either in conjunction with more traditional approaches or on it’s own.  I think that Liz’s description and perspective regarding this approach is valuable as well.  If you choose to try this approach,  alone or in conjunction with conventional and complementary therapies, please let me know what your experience is.  I always like to keep an open mind and hope to integrate more successful approaches into cancer care.

In addition, keep tabs on the natural cat care blog and see what their readers have to say.

The best prevention is minimizing exposure to carcinogens, feeding a well balanced, natural, organic diet and lots of love.

 

Lyme Disease in Horses and Dogs: Part 1

Tick

Tick

It seems like the incidence of Lyme Disease (Borrelliosis) (LD) and other tick born infections continues to rise and are flourishing this autumn.  I hear from clients about how their horses, dogs as well as themselves are just getting covered in ticks more than ever this season.  Tick born diseases have been increasing in the northeast and throughout North America for more than two decades.  In 1992, I published on one hundred horses that I diagnosed with Equine Lyme Disease based on my acupuncture physical evaluation.  I correlated my clinical findings with the horses laboratory diagnostic tests, response to antibiotic treatment as well as their behavioral history.  It seemed that  there was about  an 82% correlation of my physical examination with response to antibiotics and the laboratory tests.  I have diagnosed hundreds of horses and dogs with Lyme disease since then in the past two decades.  If left untreated it can cause severe debilitating disease and even death.  If not treated appropriately and quickly, it is not uncommon to see it reoccur and become a chronic disease with potentially devastating consequences.

Lyme Disease can be ubiquitous and quite challenging to diagnose.  It has commonly been termed “the great imitator” since it can mimic so many other common conditions.  Whenever I lecture on LD, I state that it is both overdiagnosed and underdiagnosed.  In  the past, it had only been considered part of a differential diagnosis if classic signs such as an acute onset of swollen joints and a fever were evident.  Clinically, I have found that it is not uncommon that the first signs may actually manifest as various sudden behavioral aberrations due to an immune mediated myofascial inflammatory reaction to the spirochaete.  In horses,  some of the first signs that my clients and I notice are a sudden reticence to being touched, groomed, being saddled up or ridden.  The horses may occasionally become aggressive to people when being touched or handled in anyway.     At this point, results from diagnostic blood tests may be negative since it is too early to develop a blood titer.  Unfortunately, too many veterinarians still base their diagnosis solely on the blood tests (Elisa and Western Blot blood tests) despite the reminders by the laboratories that they are not definitively diagnostic.  There is rarely one specific sign that is definitely diagnostic for just Lyme disease.  I use a checklist of criteria to decide if I think Lyme disease may be the cause of the animals signs. (more…)

Veterinarians Beyond Borders Help Himalayan Earthquake Victims

Veterinarians Beyond Borders

Veterinarians Beyond Borders

It is always great to hear from my dear friend and colleage, Dr.Catherine Schuetze, one of the key veterinarians in Veterinarians Beyond Borders of Asia.  In the midst of climatic and environmental shifts throughout the world, after the devastating earthquake in the  eastern Himalaya’s, Dr. Schuetze and her team switched roles from spaying, neutering and vaccinating dogs and cats to treating injured animals.  The epicenter, in Gangtok was right near where they happened to be working.  You can read the rest of the story in the vets beyond borders recent newsletter.

In addition, they are doing tremendous work in harsh environments controlling rampant stray dog and cat populations and helping find homes for them.  They offer programs for volunteer veterinarians, veterinary technicians and others.  Check them out online at www.vetsbeyondborders.org.

Often times, one can get overwhelmed by all the seemingly catastrophic news throughout the world. Yet, little by little, animal by animal, we can make a difference and assist in creating a more compassionate, happier, healthier world.  Dr. Schuetz is an excellent example of that.

We can all make a difference in our own way where we live.  There are many animals that can use a touching, loving hand.  More to come……

World Small Animal Veterinary Congress

Dr. Schoen guided by Korean Hostess in Traditional Korean DressI just returned from the lecturing at the World Small Animal Veterinary Congress on Jeju Island in South Korea.  It was a joy to reconnect with old colleagues and friends throughout the world.  I saw veterinary friends from South Korea, Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand,  Australia, New Zealand, China, as well as from the U.S. and Canada.  It was fascinating to hear from them about all the changes over the past few years in each of their countries amidst all the environmental, economic, political, social and conscious events of the past few years.

One story that was common throughout all the discussions was how essential animal companions had become in the midst of the massive shifts and changes throughout the world.  The unconditional love shared by our kindred spirits was becoming even more vital to help support the human soul as we maneuver through the accelerated earth changes.  As cities throughout Asia increase in population density, increase in busyness, noise, financial abundance, it seems the desire to share the small apartments with animal companions increases.  Why is this I pondered.  My feelings are that with increased emphasis on financial success, a super efficient, multi-tasking mind stream, never-ending to do lists, the heart continues to shut down.  The stress with other families members heightens and the one and only place one’s heart can receive solace, comfort, loving kindness and compassion is from our kindred spirits, dogs, cats, and other animals that we can share our homes with.  I hear this over and over again wherever I travel to teach and share about the human animal bond and integrative animal health care.

With the increase in the number of companion animals, veterinary medicine, pharmaceuticals, pet foods, supplements, new, innovative diagnostic and therapeutic modalities also are on the rise.  The quality of veterinary care improves and inadvertently so do the costs.  The dance between quality and expense must be continually evaluated and balanced based on the financial ability of the human caretaker and the life of their  animal.  The questions inevitably arise such as what price is too much to save an animal’s life.  There is no black and white answer to this and it varies from patient to patient, human to human, situation to situation.  This can be an emotional roller coaster for the veterinarian as well as clients.  It is then an opportunity for veterinarians to keep an open, compassionate heart in the midst of economic realities.  Not always easy.

One partial solution that I lecture on is the benefit of integrative animal health care and true prevention through proper, healthy, natural, balanced, nutrition along with appropriate nutritional supplements.  In addition, the importance of regular exercise and heart to heart, loving connections that both help support a healthy immune system, thereby preventing disease and expensive intervention.  These messages seem to reverberate well with most veterinarians, whereby they often have an “aha” moment on how these holistic preventive measures are truly the essence of health and happiness for all beings.

These messages seemed to especially resonate with the veterinary students that attended my lectures and I interacted with afterwards.  The Korean veterinary students reminded me  that my last book, “Kindred Spirits, How the Remarkable Bond Between Humans and Animals Can Change the Way We Live”, had been translated into Korean and shared how it nourished their souls as they worked their way through the academic rigor of veterinary studies.  As four idealistic and excited veterinary students proudly  showed me around their beautiful island, Jeju, the Island of Peace, as it is known,  I was able to guide them through different mind/body exercises and meditations that might help them balance their lives as they entered this noble, yet challenging profession.  We sat by the beach, by waterfalls and discussed how natural health care, mind body medicine, loving kindness and compassion can be integrated into modern conventional medicine and surgery.  It was nice to see, that these messages were so well received by new up and coming veterinarians, the future of veterinary medicine and health care.

In addition,  I was happy to hear from professors at Korean and other Asian veterinary schools how my textbook, “Veterinary Acupuncture, Ancient Art to Modern Medicine” was used as the essential text on Veterinary Acupuncture  throughout the region.  After taking a self-created six month sabbatical from teaching, writing and veterinary practice, it was heartening to see that veterinary students and veterinarians throughout the world are continuing to recognize the importance of natural health care and the human animal bond in the healing of the world as we all meander through these intriguing global changes.  Loving kindness and compassion  through the support of our animal companions are essential in the planetary re-adjustments and healing.

 

 

Support Nutritional Supplements for Your Kindred Spirits and You

Nutritional supplements are an essential component to an integrative approach your animal’s  and your health care.  I have been using nutritional supplements in my integrative veterinary practice for 30 years.  I feel that are indispensable in keeping your animal healthy and in treating many disease conditions.  Periodically different organizations such as the FDA attempt to control and limit access to these supplements.  They state their concern about quality control, misrepresentation, scams, fraud, etc.  These concerns are certainly valid.  I too have these concerns.  I always try to find sources of the highest quality supplements with the best evidence based research behind them.  I have seen them help so many dogs, cats, horses and other species daily in my practice.  I feel that the FDA, DSHEA guidelines the way that they have used for the past decade has addressed many of these concerns.

Yet, sometimes, different organizations may try to restrict freedom of choice and access to supplements in an effort to overreach and create impossible financial barriers to small businesses that provide these supplements.  It seems like one of those times is now.

Dr. Mercola, a world renowned natural health practitioner presents in this video on  Nutritional Supplements the current attempt to limit access to supplements.  All practitioners interested in integrative and natural health care for all beings need come together to stand up for the ability to offer these supplements to our clients and patients in order to do what we can to keep them healthy and happy.  I invite you to watch this video, contact your government representatives to help preserve our right to natural health care.

May the force be with us!

 

Dr. Mercola..Nutritional Supplements

Garden Safety Awareness for your Dogs and Cats

One of my dear clients brought this to my awareness and I realized that we need to share this information with all dog and cat caretakers. Please inform every dog or cat owner you know. Even if you don’t have a
pet, please pass this to those who do. My client shared this with me today. Over the weekend, the doting owner of two young lab mixes purchased Cocoa Mulch from one of the common box stores to use in their garden. The dogs loved the way it smelled and it was advertised to keep cats away from their garden. Their dog decided the mulch smelled good enough to eat and devoured a large helping. She vomited a few times which was typical when she eats something new but wasn’t acting lethargic in any way. The next day, Mom woke up and took their dog out for her morning walk. Halfway through the walk, she had a seizure and died instantly.

Although the mulch had NO warnings printed on the label, upon further investigation on the company’s web site,
they found the statement “This product is HIGHLY toxic to dogs and cats”. (more…)