Archive for October, 2011

Two hearts beating together and passing together

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mysticwisdom/2905883594/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mysticwisdom/2905883594/

One key principle of the Kindred Spirits Project is how we are all connected at so many different levels based on neurophysiology, quantum physics and the new biology.  This touching article in the huffington post about an elderly married couple is hard wired proof of this connection from a bioelectrical basis.  This couple was married for 72 years and  they were then both critically injured in an automobile accident. As they were holding hands together in their hospital beds,  Gordon, the husband passed away before Norma, yet his heart monitor showed that his heart was still beating.  When asked about this, “The nurse told Gordon and Norma’s son, Dennis, that the monitor was beeping “because they’re holding hands, and [Norma's heart beat] is going through them,” Dennis recalled in an interview with Des Moines’ KCCI news station. “Her heart was beating through him.”  He said they always wanted to pass away together and so they did.  Norma died exactly one hour later.  My heart weeped with joy as I read this article.

We actually are all connected in so many different ways.  I have been researching various ways to document the biological impact of people on their animal companions and vice versa.  One way is to connect an animal and a human through a special computer program that can monitor both EKG (electrocardiogram)  and EEG (electroencephalogram)  changes in both of them. At this point this has only been done between two people, but we are developing it between animals and humans.  My feeling is that when one of us calms down, the other will entrain to that slower, calmer state both in our brains and our hearts.  It can be of great benefit in all interactions with our animal companions,  a innovative, new biofeedback mechanism.  Once we program that level of entrainment in our minds, we can connect to that in our animal friends.  This may be of benefit in all equestrian activities, canine interactions as well as others.

I feel these connections go beyond just the electrophysiological connections.  Based on complicated emotions of love  as well as quantum physics, global coherence theory, heartmath and other approaches, it seems that we are connected through nonverbal, telepathic, nonlocal interactions that may indeed transcend time and space as well.  Dr. Gary Schwartz documents some of the more far reaching perspectives about these connections in his paradigm shifting book “The Afterlife Experiments”.  One of the essential components of these interactions seems to be the emotional connection of love.  The actual physiologic basis of these connections is well illustrated in the story of Gordon and Norma.

Once we become totally aware of these all potential interactions and their implications we can give and receive unconditional love, peace and harmony with our kindred spirits in even more new, innovative, yet to be explored ways.  I look forward to hearing your thoughts on this potential.

World Small Animal Veterinary Congress

Dr. Schoen guided by Korean Hostess in Traditional Korean DressI just returned from the lecturing at the World Small Animal Veterinary Congress on Jeju Island in South Korea.  It was a joy to reconnect with old colleagues and friends throughout the world.  I saw veterinary friends from South Korea, Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand,  Australia, New Zealand, China, as well as from the U.S. and Canada.  It was fascinating to hear from them about all the changes over the past few years in each of their countries amidst all the environmental, economic, political, social and conscious events of the past few years.

One story that was common throughout all the discussions was how essential animal companions had become in the midst of the massive shifts and changes throughout the world.  The unconditional love shared by our kindred spirits was becoming even more vital to help support the human soul as we maneuver through the accelerated earth changes.  As cities throughout Asia increase in population density, increase in busyness, noise, financial abundance, it seems the desire to share the small apartments with animal companions increases.  Why is this I pondered.  My feelings are that with increased emphasis on financial success, a super efficient, multi-tasking mind stream, never-ending to do lists, the heart continues to shut down.  The stress with other families members heightens and the one and only place one’s heart can receive solace, comfort, loving kindness and compassion is from our kindred spirits, dogs, cats, and other animals that we can share our homes with.  I hear this over and over again wherever I travel to teach and share about the human animal bond and integrative animal health care.

With the increase in the number of companion animals, veterinary medicine, pharmaceuticals, pet foods, supplements, new, innovative diagnostic and therapeutic modalities also are on the rise.  The quality of veterinary care improves and inadvertently so do the costs.  The dance between quality and expense must be continually evaluated and balanced based on the financial ability of the human caretaker and the life of their  animal.  The questions inevitably arise such as what price is too much to save an animal’s life.  There is no black and white answer to this and it varies from patient to patient, human to human, situation to situation.  This can be an emotional roller coaster for the veterinarian as well as clients.  It is then an opportunity for veterinarians to keep an open, compassionate heart in the midst of economic realities.  Not always easy.

One partial solution that I lecture on is the benefit of integrative animal health care and true prevention through proper, healthy, natural, balanced, nutrition along with appropriate nutritional supplements.  In addition, the importance of regular exercise and heart to heart, loving connections that both help support a healthy immune system, thereby preventing disease and expensive intervention.  These messages seem to reverberate well with most veterinarians, whereby they often have an “aha” moment on how these holistic preventive measures are truly the essence of health and happiness for all beings.

These messages seemed to especially resonate with the veterinary students that attended my lectures and I interacted with afterwards.  The Korean veterinary students reminded me  that my last book, “Kindred Spirits, How the Remarkable Bond Between Humans and Animals Can Change the Way We Live”, had been translated into Korean and shared how it nourished their souls as they worked their way through the academic rigor of veterinary studies.  As four idealistic and excited veterinary students proudly  showed me around their beautiful island, Jeju, the Island of Peace, as it is known,  I was able to guide them through different mind/body exercises and meditations that might help them balance their lives as they entered this noble, yet challenging profession.  We sat by the beach, by waterfalls and discussed how natural health care, mind body medicine, loving kindness and compassion can be integrated into modern conventional medicine and surgery.  It was nice to see, that these messages were so well received by new up and coming veterinarians, the future of veterinary medicine and health care.

In addition,  I was happy to hear from professors at Korean and other Asian veterinary schools how my textbook, “Veterinary Acupuncture, Ancient Art to Modern Medicine” was used as the essential text on Veterinary Acupuncture  throughout the region.  After taking a self-created six month sabbatical from teaching, writing and veterinary practice, it was heartening to see that veterinary students and veterinarians throughout the world are continuing to recognize the importance of natural health care and the human animal bond in the healing of the world as we all meander through these intriguing global changes.  Loving kindness and compassion  through the support of our animal companions are essential in the planetary re-adjustments and healing.

 

 

Natural, Innovative Approaches to Cancer

Cancer in animals is increasing dramatically and in some area’s it is the leading cause of death in dogs and cats.  There is great speculation on all the potential causes.  In my practice I have treated hundreds of animals with cancer with an integrative approach over twenty years.  My attitude has always been to present to clients all the different therapeutic options in order to allow them to make an educated decision based on their own attitudes and perspectives on treatment.  I find some clients prefer a conventional approach based on their personal beliefs and positive experiences with family and friends who had responded well to chemotherapy, surgery and radiation.  Other clients prefer a completely natural approach based on their own personal beliefs and negative experiences with family and friends who did not respond well to chemotherapy, surgery or radiation.  I honor all people’s opinions and then offer an integrative approach based on the research results regarding a particular tumor type, the age of the animal, quality of life and the individual animal and the family situation.  Taking all of this into consideration is a more holistic approach. I have always stated that no one form of medicine has all the answers and it just seems reasonable to offer a more integrative approach.

Ideally, I also try to find the cause of the cancer wherever it is possible and see if there is something we can do based on the cause.  Some cancers in animals have a definitive genetic predisposition with all the inbreeding.  Others appear to be environmental or nutritional or possibly medication induced.

I have always searched for complementary, natural, nontoxic approaches wherever possible.  Recently, there was a documentary on Dr. Burzynski and his approach with antineoplastins in humans.  I remember working with Dr. Burzynski almost twenty years ago looking at the potential of using his approach based on proteins in the urine that were killed cancer cells.  I also explored antiangiogenic approaches as well as different nutritional and nutraceutical approaches. I have also used different Oriental medical herbal approaches with great success.   In most cases animals were able to live a longer, happier, healthier life with few if any side effects, though I cannot say that we ever cured cancer.  Clients were quite happy that there animals lived a quality life for a longer period of time.

I continue to look at for new innovative, nontoxic approaches.  I have recently been reviewing a number of these approaches and will share them with you periodically.  I recently came across this fascinating article on a bacteria found naturally in soil that unlike current chemotherapy, the natural bacteria treatment causes only the cancer cells to be destroyed while healthy cells are left unharmed.  This is the goal with most of the approaches that I search for.   You can learn more at:http://www.naturalnews.com/033505_soil_bacteria_cancer_tumors.html#ixzz1aUXuXR

As we work together to create a more compassionate society, offering an integrative approach to cancer care is an essential component to allow our animal friends a quality life as they get older and confront health care crises.  It allows us to confront our own choices on what we might do if confronted with our own personal crisis like this.  It allows us to develop a more compassionate approach to death and dying.  It also allows us an opportunity to develop a more compassionate approach to life with all other beings and for being in the moment and appreciating each moment.

Prevention of course is a key to cancer care.  Nutrition and nutraceuticals are a key component in preventive cancer care.  We will discuss this in more detail in future posts.

Be well, Be happy, Be peaceful, calm and alert!

National Wolf Awareness Week

Periodically I enjoy introducing kindred spirits to each other.  My dear friends at the Wolf Conservation Center in South Salem, NY are doing extraordinary work to preserve endangered species of wolves.  In addition, one veterinarian who used to work with me, Dr. Amy Rodriguez and her husband, Neil Abramson,  have worked for the benefit of animals through their entire adult lives.  Dr. Rodriguez is an excellent integrative veterinarian and her husband is one of our nation’s top legal advocates for animals. I had the honor of reviewing Neil’s first novel, “Unsaid” about the deeper connections with animals.  It is definitely a great read about the deeper spiritual connections that we share with our animal friends and will touch many people.  These friends of come together at a booksigning of Neil’s new book in order to benefit the Wolf Conservation Center.

Here is the notice about these great events.  These are truly kindred spirits helping to create a more compassionate society. I am grateful to share their friendship with all of you.

Celebrate National Wolf Awareness Week at the Wolf Conservation Center


Wolf Conservation Center <contact@nywolf.org> Fri, Oct 7, 2011 at 3:25 PM
 

Reply-To: contact@nywolf.org
To: amsdvm@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

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Celebrate National Wolf Awareness Week at the WCC

National Wolf Awareness Week begins on October 16th, but we’re celebrating all month long!

Please scroll down to learn about Wolves Of YellowstoneBook Signing to Benefit the WCCUp, Up and Away on Wolf Awareness DayWCC’s Outdoor Movie NightsWCC’s Halloween Howl, and Who’s Scaring Who.

The celebration begins this weekend!


Wolves Of Yellowstone

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October 8th at 11am – Join us for a special talk about the wolves of Yellowstone National Park!  The WCC hosted some fantastic Yellowstone adventures last season and we’re eager to share our insights about wolf reintroduction, the beneficial ecological effect wolves have had on our nation’s first national park, and the debate that surrounds this controversial predator in the West.   Guests will visit Ambassador wolves Atka, Alawa, and Zephyr as well as the WCC’s critically endangered red wolves and Mexican gray wolves.Pre-registration is required.  Click here to register now!

Book Signing to Benefit the WCC

October 11th at 7PM – Calling all animal lovers and WCC supporters!  Neil Abramson, WCC neighbor and volunteer, and one of our nation’s top legal advocates for animals, will be at the City Center in White Plains for a reading, discussion and signing of “Unsaid” — a heartfelt and compassionate novel that explores the intuitive bonds between people and animals that transcend explanation.unsaid.jpgNeil is donating all profits from books sold at the event to the WCC!

Tuesday, October 11, 7:00 PM
Barnes & Noble Book Store
City Center
230 Main Street
White Plains, NY

 


Up, Up, and Away on Wolf Awareness Day

compressed crooped.jpgOctober 16th at 11AM and 2PM – The WCC is celebrating the first day of National Wolf Awareness Week with an exciting bird of prey experience presented by Master Falconer, Lorrie Schumacher, of TALONS!  Guests will meet, catch, fly and be wowed some beautiful feathered ambassadors during the educational and interactive bird of Prey experience.  Don’t forget a camera!  After flying some of Talon’s “wolves of the sky,” guests will visit Ambassador wolves Atka, Alawa, and Zephyr as well as the WCC’s critically endangered red wolves and Mexican gray wolves too.  Each guest will receive an official 2011 Wolf Awareness poster! Pre Pre-registration is required. Click here to register today!

 

Outdoor Movie Nights at the WCC

Join us for a unique opportunity to enjoy some compelling wolf films under the stars alongside Ambassador wolves Zephyr and Alawa! Bleacher seating will be available but we recommend guests to bring beach/camping chairs of their own for more a comfortable experience. Snacks will be provided for our guests and wolves! Each guest will also receive an official 2011 Wolf Awareness poster. Pre- registration is required.

rise of black wolf.jpgOctober 21st at 6:30PM – Our first Movie Night will feature: The Rise of Black Wolf by Emmy award-winning wildlife cinematographer and friend of the WCC -  Bob Landis! Landis has produced many films for programs such as National Geographic and Nature and it will be a thrill to enjoy the film alongside the WCC’s resident black wolf, Zephyr!  Click here to register today!
lords of nature.jpgOctober 28th at 6:30PM – Our second Movie Night will feature: Green Fire Productions’Lords of Nature: Life in a Land of Great Predators. The compelling 60 minute documentary captures the importance of predators in the West and the challenges they face in our modern landscape. Click here to register today!

 

halloween atka.jpg 

WCC’s Halloween Howl

October 29th at 5PM – Trick or treat! Our Ambassador wolves don’t do tricks but shari
ng a sunset howl is always a treat!  Holiday appropriate goodies will be offered to our guests and wolves. Guests will also visit the WCC’s critically endangered red wolves and Mexican gray wolves. Costumes are encouraged! Pre Pre-registration is required. Clickhere to register today!

Who’s Scaring Who?
Scarecrow Fun at the WCC


October 30th at 11AM – Learn about the mythology, biology and ecology of wolf families and discover why the fall is such a magical time for packs in North America and people too. Guests will work together to customize a scarecrow for Atka to enjoy or destroy!   Guests will also visit the WCC’s critically endangered red wolves and Mexican gray wolves. Pre Pre-registration is required.  Click here to register today!
Click here to view our October program schedule.
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Email: nywolf@nywolf.org
Phone: 914-763-2373
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Wolf Conservation Center, P.O. Box 421 South Salem, NY 10590, Tel: 914-763-2373
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